OUR SERVICES

Treatments and finishing

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OUR SERVICES

Treatments and finishing

You are here:
Treatments and finishing

TREATED AND UNTREATED

TRTM buys its timber in the form of lumber from major known suppliers or at times already sawn wood from our sistering companies.We get supplied the best of what is available in the market at the time. However, every piece of wood still goes through our own thorough inspections, to make sure TRTM’s quality standards are maintained. Reasons why TRTM with reassurance and peace of mind can claim to supply our loyal patronage of clienteles with quality timber logs and raw timber, sawn to size, treated, untreated and to custom order with the furnishing we can provide our clients with.
We do not necessarily have to treat the wood we sell, as you know south east Asia has a tropical climate and being on and around the equator line, it produces bug and insect free timber in most cases. It is one of the few places in our world to harvest perfect timber. From the few places in our world, to harvest perfect timber it is the best within its region . Having family and friends around that region and in this trade for many years, our sources provide us with the best available timber.
But some type of species do need the necessary treatment from that region, mainly the soft woods we source from that region. All our timber coming from Brazil, USA and mainland Europe receive all necessary treatments before being shipped to destinations all around the globe.

Treatments and finishing

TREATED AND UNTREATED

TRTM buys its timber in the form of lumber from major known suppliers or at times already sawn wood from our sistering companies.We get supplied the best of what is available in the market at the time. However, every piece of wood still goes through our own thorough inspections, to make sure TRTM’s quality standards are maintained. Reasons why TRTM with reassurance and peace of mind can claim to supply our loyal patronage of clienteles with quality timber logs and raw timber, sawn to size, treated, untreated and to custom order with the furnishing we can provide our clients with.
We do not necessarily have to treat the wood we sell, as you know south east Asia has a tropical climate and being on and around the equator line, it produces bug and insect free timber in most cases. It is one of the few places in our world to harvest perfect timber. From the few places in our world, to harvest perfect timber it is the best within its region . Having family and friends around that region and in this trade for many years, our sources provide us with the best available timber.
But some type of species do need the necessary treatment from that region, mainly the soft woods we source from that region. All our timber coming from Brazil, USA and mainland Europe receive all necessary treatments before being shipped to destinations all around the globe.

Treatments and finishing

DRYING PROCESS

Our timber gets dried in the traditional processes, artificial air drying, and some get kiln dried.
Wood drying (also seasoning lumber or wood seasoning) reduces the moisture content of wood before its use. When the drying is done in a kiln, the product is known as kiln-dried timber or lumber, whereas air drying is the more traditional method.
There are two main reasons for drying wood:
When wood is used as a construction material, whether as a structural support in a building or in woodworking objects, it will absorb or expel moisture until it is in equilibrium with its surroundings. Equilibration (usually drying) causes unequal shrinkage in the wood and can cause damage to the wood if equilibration occurs too rapidly. The equilibration must be controlled to prevent damage to the wood. Wood is air-dried or dried in a purpose-built oven (kiln). Usually, the wood is sawn before drying, but sometimes the log is dried whole. Wood is divided, according to its botanical origin, into two kinds: softwoods, from coniferous trees, and hardwoods, from broad-leaved trees. Softwoods are lighter and generally simple in structure, whereas hardwoods are harder and more complex. However, in Australia, softwood generally describes rain forest trees, and hardwood describes Sclerophyll species (Eucalyptus spp). Wood drying may be described as the art of ensuring that gross dimensional changes through shrinkage are confined to the drying process. Ideally, wood is dried to that equilibrium moisture content as will later (in service) be attained by the wood. Thus, further dimensional change will be kept to a minimum. Drying, if carried out promptly after felling of trees, also protects timber against primary decay, fungal stain, and attack by certain kinds of insects. Organisms, which cause decay and stain, generally cannot thrive in timber with a moisture content below 20%. Several, though not all, insect pests can live only in green timber.

Treatments and finishing

DRYING PROCESS

Our timber gets dried in the traditional processes, artificial air drying, and some get kiln dried.
Wood drying (also seasoning lumber or wood seasoning) reduces the moisture content of wood before its use. When the drying is done in a kiln, the product is known as kiln-dried timber or lumber, whereas air drying is the more traditional method.
There are two main reasons for drying wood:
When wood is used as a construction material, whether as a structural support in a building or in woodworking objects, it will absorb or expel moisture until it is in equilibrium with its surroundings. Equilibration (usually drying) causes unequal shrinkage in the wood and can cause damage to the wood if equilibration occurs too rapidly. The equilibration must be controlled to prevent damage to the wood. Wood is air-dried or dried in a purpose-built oven (kiln). Usually, the wood is sawn before drying, but sometimes the log is dried whole. Wood is divided, according to its botanical origin, into two kinds: softwoods, from coniferous trees, and hardwoods, from broad-leaved trees. Softwoods are lighter and generally simple in structure, whereas hardwoods are harder and more complex. However, in Australia, softwood generally describes rain forest trees, and hardwood describes Sclerophyll species (Eucalyptus spp). Wood drying may be described as the art of ensuring that gross dimensional changes through shrinkage are confined to the drying process. Ideally, wood is dried to that equilibrium moisture content as will later (in service) be attained by the wood. Thus, further dimensional change will be kept to a minimum. Drying, if carried out promptly after felling of trees, also protects timber against primary decay, fungal stain, and attack by certain kinds of insects. Organisms, which cause decay and stain, generally cannot thrive in timber with a moisture content below 20%. Several, though not all, insect pests can live only in green timber.

Treatments and finishing

AIR DRYING

Air drying is the drying of timber by exposing it to the air. The technique of air drying consists mainly of making a stack of sawn timber (with the layers of boards separated by stickers) on raised foundations, in a clean, cool, dry, and shady place. Rate of drying largely depends on climatic conditions, and on the air movement (exposure to the wind). For successful air drying, a continuous and uniform flow of air throughout the pile of the timber needs to be arranged.
The rate of loss of moisture can be controlled by coating the planks with any substance that is relatively impermeable to moisture; ordinary mineral oil is usually quite effective. Coating the ends of logs with oil or thick paint improves their quality upon drying. Wrapping planks or logs in materials which will allow some movement of moisture, generally works very well provided the wood is first treated against fungal infection by coating in petrol/gasoline or oil. Mineral oil will generally not soak in more than 1–2 mm below the surface and is easily removed by planning when the timber is suitably dry.
• Benefits: It can be less expensive to use this drying method (there are still costs associated with storing the wood, and with the slower process of getting the wood to market), and air drying often produces a higher quality, more easily workable wood than with kiln drying.
• Drawbacks: Depending on the climate, it takes several months to several years to air-dry the wood.

Treatments and finishing

AIR DRYING

Air drying is the drying of timber by exposing it to the air. The technique of air drying consists mainly of making a stack of sawn timber (with the layers of boards separated by stickers) on raised foundations, in a clean, cool, dry, and shady place. Rate of drying largely depends on climatic conditions, and on the air movement (exposure to the wind). For successful air drying, a continuous and uniform flow of air throughout the pile of the timber needs to be arranged.
The rate of loss of moisture can be controlled by coating the planks with any substance that is relatively impermeable to moisture; ordinary mineral oil is usually quite effective. Coating the ends of logs with oil or thick paint improves their quality upon drying. Wrapping planks or logs in materials which will allow some movement of moisture, generally works very well provided the wood is first treated against fungal infection by coating in petrol/gasoline or oil. Mineral oil will generally not soak in more than 1–2 mm below the surface and is easily removed by planning when the timber is suitably dry.
• Benefits: It can be less expensive to use this drying method (there are still costs associated with storing the wood, and with the slower process of getting the wood to market), and air drying often produces a higher quality, more easily workable wood than with kiln drying.
• Drawbacks: Depending on the climate, it takes several months to several years to air-dry the wood.

Treatments and finishing

KILN DRYING

The process of artificial or ‘oven’ drying consists basically of introducing heat. This may be directly, using natural gas and/or electricity or indirectly, through steam-heated heat exchangers. Solar energy is also an option. In the process, deliberate control of temperature, relative humidity and air circulation creates variable conditions to achieve specific drying profiles. To achieve this, the timber is stacked in chambers, which are fitted with equipment to control atmospheric temperature, relative humidity, and circulation.
Chamber drying provides a means of overcoming the limitations imposed by erratic weather conditions. With kiln drying, as is the case with air drying, unsaturated air is used as the drying medium. Almost all commercial timbers of the world are dried in industrial kilns. A comparison of air drying, conventional kiln, and solar drying.

Treatments and finishing

KILN DRYING

The process of artificial or ‘oven’ drying consists basically of introducing heat. This may be directly, using natural gas and/or electricity or indirectly, through steam-heated heat exchangers. Solar energy is also an option. In the process, deliberate control of temperature, relative humidity and air circulation creates variable conditions to achieve specific drying profiles. To achieve this, the timber is stacked in chambers, which are fitted with equipment to control atmospheric temperature, relative humidity, and circulation.
Chamber drying provides a means of overcoming the limitations imposed by erratic weather conditions. With kiln drying, as is the case with air drying, unsaturated air is used as the drying medium. Almost all commercial timbers of the world are dried in industrial kilns. A comparison of air drying, conventional kiln, and solar drying.

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      PROJECTS AND IDEAS

      PROJECTS AND IDEAS

      We at T.R.T.M LTD are very much committed to control our supplies of southeast Asian, European and the species from the American sub continent ,hardwoods and soft woods to exclude timber harvested from the following sources:

      1. Forest areas where traditional or civil rights are violated
      2. Uncertified forest areas with high conservation values
      3. Genetically modified trees
      4. Forest areas which have been illegally harvested
      5. Natural forests cleared for plantation or other use
      6. T.R.T.M’s replacement tree planting program

      WE CARE ABOUT OUR WORLD AND TRUST OUR CUSTOMERS DO TO!